Centralia, OK

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City/Town:
Location Class:
Year Built: 1899 | Year Abandoned: N/A
Status: Abandoned
Photojournalist: Johnny Fletcher

J.H. Hargrove is said to have been the father of Centralia. In 1898 he first ascended Blue Mound, made a survey, then located the town on prairie land with the only elevations in the region, Blue Mound, Potato Hill, Leforce, and Notch Mounds surrounding the town. Hargrove lived about one half mile northwest of the town site. He was from Missouri and was believed to have named the town after Centralia, Missouri.

Hargrove started a post office at the new town site. Sam Bradfield and his son-in-law, Adam Holden, came from Bluejacket the same year and built a livery barn. Mont McGee came from Edna, Kansas, and started a grocery store, while the Mowry Hardware was started by another Edna man and managed by Bob Allen. A little later Henry Hyman opened a grocery store and Joe Lehman started a grocery, as did Messrs. Shinn and Rogers.

The first house built in town was a block north of the park, and Adam Holden’s house was built across the street in 1899.

The old Coffeyville, Kansas, to Vinita road was located about two miles northeast of Centralia. That road angled southeast across the flat prairie land. Plans called for a railroad to be built from Vinita to Centralia to Coffeyville, to be called the “Vinita and Western”. It was staked out and part of the grade built about nine miles northwest of Vinita as far as Woodley. 1906 and 1907 maps showed the line which was never completed.

The town’s height of prosperity was 1907-1915. By the latter year, it had grown in size to 750 people. There were two banks: the Farmers & Merchants headed by Frank Conkright, and the First State Bank which had originally been organized by the T.R. Montgomery family as a national bank. People who were associated with the banks in Centralia other than the above mentioned included Fred Hartley who went to a Grove bank, Bill Reynolds who later was an officer in the Vinita First National Bank, Howard Nix who was president of Vinita Production Credit Association for many years, Caney Spence who later became a Craig County official. By 1930, both Centralia banks had closed.




Over a period of prosperous years, businesses in Centralia included grocery stores operated by Henry Hyman, Joe Lehman, George B. Parks, J.F. McCoy, Everett Christian, and J.F. Clawson. There were Ben Pennington’s and Comstock’s Groceries across the street south of the park and Mrs. May’s grocery west of the park. Livery stables were operated by Sam Bradfield, Adam Holden, J.H. Hargrove, and Frank Nix. Blacksmiths included John Mowry, Mr. Haskett, and Mr. Jackson. Other businesses during the prosperous years included John Rich’s General Machine and Wagon Work, C.E. Vanbibber well driller, White’s Hardware and Undertaking, Day’s Variety Store, Tolliver’s Dry Goods, Johnston’s Millinery and General Store, and Dry Goods, Noah Harrison’s Dry Goods, C.W. Miller’s General Store. A newspaper, the Centralia Standard was established in 1902 by T.F. McCain and continued publication for several years. People who stopped overnight or for meals had the facilities of O.H. Johnson’s Hotel, Carpenter’s Hotel, and Hyman’s Hotel. “Mall Daniel had a boarding house which was a popular eating place in the 1920s”.

Early settlers were always concerned about having a good water supply. There was a well in the Centralia town square which continued to be used for many years to water stock in a trough. In 1912, it is told that Les White switched” a well in a street northeast of the center of the town which became known as the “town well”. A pump was put on it and later an engine to pump the water. It was used by all of the towns people. John Mowry had a motor at his blacksmith shop which ran an electric light plant providing power for home lights and streets. It was owned by the town and operated by Mowry.

The business district was built around a square; the only such one in Craig County. The central park contained a court house and there was a jail house behind it. Mr. Bowsman was the town marshal. The community had a library for the residents.

The town sponsored annual fall festivals which included a carnival with a merry-go-round priced at five cents a ride. The fair was held in the town square, and there was a large display of buggies and other vehicles. Luanna Mabery Monroe told that the fair festivities included horse races “in the middle of Centralia’s street”.

The first school building was a four-room frame structure in the north section of town. Early teachers included Mrs. Grace Anderson and Miss Clara Haggerman. In 1910, a four-room brick building was constructed in the southeast part of town and the early frame school was torn down. Tom W. Smith was Centralia superintendent at the time. He later became Craig County Superintendent of Schools.

The schools in those early days were heated with large coal-burning pot-bellied stoves for which the teacher was responsible. The youngsters brought half-gallon syrup buckets filled with lunches of ham, homemade light bread or biscuits left from breakfast, some-times baked sweet potatoes and fruit. They either walked to school, sometimes for miles, or some came by horseback or buggy and stabled the horses for the day at the livery barn.

In 1925 after consolidation of several outlying districts, the four-room brick school was remodeled into a ten-room building with a large gymnasium. While the new school was being constructed, classes were held in houses, churches, and in the lodge hall over the First State Bank. It was largely through the efforts of J.W. McCollum, superintendent, that consolidation was accomplished. The Centralia schools closed in 1968-69 when the district was annexed by Bluejacket and White Oak.

A fire January 11, 1907 destroyed much of the business district, including the two-story hotel run by Mrs. Ollie Carpenter. The volunteer fire department was unsuccessful in saving it. One-third of the business district of Centralia was destroyed by fire on July 22, 1917. The buildings were frame except for the two-story brick bank, and the southwest corner of the business district on the square was demolished by the blaze.

The church was the center of community social life. For some years, the congregations shared a building which the Methodists owned. By 1915, the Church of Christ, Missionary Baptist, and Primitive Baptists had their own buildings. There was also a Holiness Congregation. Members of the Primitive Baptist Church included the O.E. Odells, Charlie Christians, and the Chaney families. The Methodist congregation included the Montgomery’s: T.R., T.C. Howard and Jack, the Andy Martins, Jim Armors, Judge F.L. Haymes. The Church of Christ members included the George B. Parks, James 0. Nix, and, Legg families.

Mrs. Lizzie (Gleason) Oskison recalled that two of the first automobiles in Craig County were owned in 1910 by Centralia men: Richard Oskison, her brother-in-law, and T.C. Montgomery. “They about scared the horses to death coming down the road. The cars didn’t have doors.” There was a Camp Fire Girls organization in the town in the 1920s, with Miss Mary Bragg, teacher, as the leader. Girls included Margarite and Ruby Lee Parks, Jewell Carlock, Bernice and Opal Webb, and Leona Chaney.

The fires in downtown Centralia, the 1929 depression and the resulting closing of the banks in the town, the abandonment of the promised railroad spur from Vinita to Coffeyville which was planned to go to Centralia, and the re-routing of the Ozark Trail all contributed to the demise of Centralia.
A photograph of the Centralia City Council taken between 1897 and 1904. James Washington Lafayette Blair is in the picture, and he lived in Centralia during that period. According to a later newspaper he was city clerk and postmaster while at Centralia. Others in the photo are: J.H. Van Ausdal, Rob Allen, Les White, W.E. Ware, W.W. Clapper, and Henry Heiman. However, the photo does not identify who goes with which name.

There were 43 residents in the 1980 census, as of 2010 those numbers have dwindled quite considerably to about 7 or 8 homesteads & the only original buildings left are the ones featured in the gallery.

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Denise-Spence-Taylor
Denise-Spence-Taylor
4 years ago

There was a Centralia School Reunion held last Saturday at the Vinita Fairgrounds…Enjoyed every minute of it,My Dad was Caney Spence and was mentioned as one of the Centralia bank employees…My 3 brothers, Bill Spence, Jim (Sonny) Spence and Tommy Jack Spence as well as myself all attended school in Centralia..we lived south of the Trail and Kelly Hartley's Ranch…—4th generation Spence lives there now…

Jack Smith
Jack Smith
4 years ago

My name is Jack Smith. My family lived in Centrailia in the late '50s. My parents were T.J. and Dorothy Smith. My dad had a shop in an old gas station where he worked on cars, welded, and he also painted barns and drove the school bus. I was only 4 or 5 years old but I recall riding the bus and the kids taking my ball cap every day and the last kid off the bus would give it back. There was a small grocery store in town and also a DX gas station that someone I called "Deanie"… Read more »

Beverly (Fair) Galyean
Beverly (Fair) Galyean
Reply to  Jack Smith
1 year ago

My name is Beverly (Fair) Galyean. Alfred & Virginia Fair are my parents. I remember visiting at your parents home in Centralia. You’re correct in that they were good friends. The very place where your parents lived later became the location of my grandparents on my mother’s side of the family after he retired from the AF and moved to Centralia. Although the home was replaced with a new built home, all the old outbuildings remained, which I believe may have been the shop you were speaking of. The little boy who drowned was last name Pitts (I believe his… Read more »

Jason Adair
Jason Adair
5 years ago

My grandmother went to school there.
Lucille Kinnick

Lisa.O'Dell Yates
Lisa.O'Dell Yates
7 years ago

My Grandma was Maudie O'Dell. She and Marie Miller were the school cooks for Cenralia School. I reamember going to that kitchen, lunchroom when I was little. I can still smell the hot rolls! I loved Centralia . The people were so good to us kids. We were everyone's kids when we visited. Every one knew everyone. Great childhood experiences. When I was 11 or 12 years old, My dad decided to move our family to Centralia. I had lots of great adventures on the prairie on my horse. The school was closed by then, so I went to Bluejacket… Read more »

Mary Shelton
Mary Shelton
9 years ago

Our father, Jesse Emerson Rice Shelton, was born in Centralia in September 1907. His parents, Harvey W.C. Shelton and Mary Anne Elizabeth Duncan (Mae) Shelton, taught at the Cherokee Female Seminary. In the summer of 1968, the family drove around for hours looking for Centralia and gave up without finding it. I have a strong memory of standing on the side of the highway, watching my father walk around in the brush, asking my mother how much longer we'd have to wait. At the time, we were all just hot (no car air conditioning) and exhausted, but since then that… Read more »

Sheri Dockins Robinson
Sheri Dockins Robinson
3 months ago

My mother was born in Centralia in 1944. I spent many summer vacations in Centralia visiting my grandparents and great grandparents. I have fond memories from back then, ’70’s and ’80’s. There were many names in the story that I can remember, but both my parents have passed so there no one to ask. I do have photographs of a open working garage, the post office, and other buildings. Brought back memories.

Suzanne Hurst
Suzanne Hurst
1 year ago

Opal Webb was my grandmother. She and her sister are mentioned in the article as members of the Camp Fire girls in the second to last paragraph.

trackback
3 years ago

[…] cemeteries which have Chamberlin/Chamberlain’s & LeForce’s in them.  According to this site there was even a LeForce mound in Centralia.  I’ve never seen their farm house & from […]

Donna
Donna
4 years ago

My mother was from the Centralia. Her father had a farm outside the town. The Wier family was made up of Franklin, Ida Olive and their 11 children. I believe there was also an uncle Ed that also lived in the area.
Does anyone know of or have any information on my family? I heard that the farm was lost during the dust bowl period (the depression).

Adams Toyota
4 years ago

Thank you so much for posting this. I think this really puts things into a different light. I mean, I have read about this stuff before but the way you write just makes it clearer. If that makes sense

Adams Toyota
4 years ago

Excellent! Another freakin' FANTASTIC post. Read of course by your number 1 FANtastic person 🙂

matt davenport
matt davenport
4 years ago

Anybody have any information on the davenports my grandfather went to school there

glennscheer
glennscheer
4 years ago

My great grandfather was Otis E. O'Dell, grandfather Earl, grandmother Lily, and their children Irene, Cecil, Marie, my mom Lucille, and Fred O'Dell were all residents of Centralia. My 92-year-old mother is writing a book about Centralia. If you are interested in contributing a story to the book, please let me know. There will be no cost for the book, only contributions will be accepted once the book is written. my address is glennscheer1945@gmail.com, or you can call 417-662-0025. I am Glenn Scheer, and I am hoping that some of you will want to be a co-writers of this history… Read more »

Kelly Odell
Kelly Odell
Reply to  glennscheer
4 years ago

Hi, I'm Kelly Odell. My dad was George Odell, his father was Cecil. I remember the name Glenn Scheer but had no idea that he is a relative. I would love to get more information on the family tree.

Laura Dunn
Laura Dunn
Reply to  glennscheer
1 year ago

My great-grandfather Theo D. Borden moved to Centralia from Coffeyville in 1905. He married a young woman there named Ruby B Young from Centralia in December 1905. I was told by my grandmother that Ruby was Native American. I can’t find much information on them until they moved to Houston, TX where they were listed in a phone directory in 1911. Ruby may have passed away the following year when my grandmother was born. Theo continued to live in Houston until his death in 1937. If anyone has any information about their years in Centralia, I would love to hear… Read more »

Wanda Myers
Wanda Myers
6 years ago

My mother, Naomi Cortner Myers, was born in Centralia on January 2, 1905. Her parents were Lillie and Sam Cortner. Sam Cortner's mother was Martha Colvin Campbell Welch. Sam worked in a grocery store at the time of my mother's birth. There are siblings of my mother buried in unmarked graves in the Centralia Cemetery. Does anyone have any information or pictures regarding the Cortner and Welch families?

Betty has kit ray
Betty has kit ray
6 years ago

My great grandad Mr Has kit owned the blacksmith shop

Steve Simmons
Steve Simmons
6 years ago

I am looking for my Great Great Grandfather who supposedly lived here from 1904 till 1909 when he passed away. His name was George Washington Stamps. I was told he took up preaching in his later years. Say's he died in Bluejacket Oklahoma. He was born in 1841 and his wife was Martha Jane Stamps. She later passed on in Springtown Arkansas by Gentry Arkansas and is buried in Springtown Cemetery. I would like to locate his final resting spot as hopefully to get a picture of a headstone or other. If any information, please contact me: Steve Simmons: steve@dwgatesengineering.com… Read more »

Holly
Holly
Reply to  Steve Simmons
4 years ago

Have you looked on Findagrave.com? I found him and Martha Jane on there. They're in different cemeteries

Robert Walker
Robert Walker
8 years ago

I'm thinking of Centralia, OK. Located northeast of Nowata. My grandmother lived in Centralia prior to 1925. She was born In Centralia in 1908. Her name was Josie DeBoard. She was married to Loyd Griffin and had a daughter L Ray Griffin. She remarried in 1927 to my grandfather, Fred Henry Walker. Her parents were Lewis T. and Nancy J. (White) DeBoard. Nancy is buried in a cemetery at Delaware. I would like to hear any additional information on any party that was mentioned.–Robert Walker

JoshDaniels
JoshDaniels
10 years ago

Just a reminder to those who may think this. This is not the same Centralia you are thinking of. The Centralia you may be thinking of is in Pennsylvania/

joe foreman
joe foreman
8 years ago

this is centralia oklahoma i was born ther in 1931 sure like seeing the pccturs bring back a lot of memors

guest
guest
8 years ago

Three Provence sisters visited there a couple of years back. They tried to find the houses they lived in when they were growing up, but only found part of one that used to be next to a church. It was so sad to see Centralia with nothing there.

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