Historic I-40 Crosstown

22
City/Town: Oklahoma City
Location Class: IndustrialCommercialGovernment
Year Built: 1960's
Year Abandoned: 2012
Status: Demolished
Photojournalist: Michael Schwarz

Oklahoma’s three major interstates converge near downtown Oklahoma City where I-35 and I-44 intersect I-40 at either end of a four-mile stretch known as the Crosstown. The original Crosstown was built about five blocks north of I-40’s new alignment through downtown Oklahoma City.

Completed in 1966, the original three-lane I-40 Crosstown was designed to carry up to 76,000 vehicles daily. By 2005 when ground was broken for the new highway, it routinely carried as many as 125,000 vehicles each day.

The Crosstown was constructed using an engineering process commonly termed as “fracture critical”, a process that has not been used since the 1970s because it does not provide redundancies. According to Brian Windsor, an ODOT structural engineer, without redundant support, the failure of a single beam creates the risk of total collapse of that section of bridge. The entire stretch of the Crosstown is elevated, and at some points, the elevation is as much as 50 feet (15.2 m). In an August 2007 poll sponsored by The Oklahoman, nearly ⅔ of respondents indicated that they were “afraid to drive across the Crosstown bridge in Oklahoma City”.

The new $670 million I-40 Crosstown is designed to carry 173,000 vehicles daily on five lanes in each direction. A planned multi-lane boulevard offering a connection to downtown Oklahoma City will further increase traffic capacity in the area.

When the Old Crosstown closed, we knew we needed to capture this once grand highway and document it before it becomes just a memory. Enjoy!

22
Leave a Reply

avatar
18 Comment threads
4 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
  Subscribe  
Notify of
Nancy Fehmer
Guest

wow!

ferd berfle
Guest

I remember when the Crosstown was opened back in the 60s. It was a wonder then (to a 9 year old). The last time I drove across it (visiting in 2007), I knew its days were numbered. Pity, that.

Alicia
Guest
Alicia

I grew up an hour north of OKC and I remember going down this I-40 crosstown when we'd take trips to OKC. I went to OKC a few years ago before my husband and I got married to visit a friend of mine. We went downtown and I remember seeing the old crosstown.

Joel
Guest
Joel

man.. used that Classen exit weekly! the new crosstown doesn't even have a classen exit!
ya know I'm all for the new crosstown, and I love it, but man… seeing these pictures really made me realize that it's ACTUALLY not gonna be there anymore. this bridge has been such an important part of the OKC horizon for so many years. the strange puzzle that is the OKC skyline will forever be missing a piece.

Ranma Tardis
Guest
Ranma Tardis

It is gone now and the new ones are starting to weather. In 20 years or less they will have to be replaced due to lack of even basic maintenance. Look at the 244 bridges in Tulsa? Stupid Stupid Stupid!!!

rezman
Guest
rezman

Been across that strip of higway many many times. Since I was a kid growing up in Warr Acres in the 60's. I wanted to get up there and get some pics after it closed, but was never able to. You some shots I wanted to get in the same locations I wanted to take them. … I'm glad you got them. You've recorded a big piece of this city's history that is now gone.

trackback

[…] Find More pictures that we took on AbandonedOK […]

trackback

[…] IIRC, just to create an HOV lane, it takes 2-3 lanes to configure; then, there's the personnel needed to monitor those lanes and remove those concrete block barriers daily to adjust to the traffic flow needs used to make the process work for the rush–not to mention what happens if someone's vehicle stalled in that lane. The traffic concerns in Dallas is an example of interchange constipation. Just don't see an immediate need for an HOV (High Occupancy Vehicle) lane in OKC or Tulsa for that matter. Our traffic doesn't mimic the congestion in a mega market like Dallas'… Read more »

Copyright 2008-2020 by AbandonedOK.com - info@AbandonedOK.com.com - Designed By Michael Schwarz - Disclaimer