Maud, OK

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City/Town: Maud
Location Class: Disappearing Town
Year Built: April 16, 1896
Year Abandoned: N/A
Status: AbandonedDisappearing Town
Photojournalist: Jennifer BurtonLeslie Flaming

History:

Maud, OK is best known as the birthplace of Wanda Jackson, the queen of rockabilly. The town is located at the intersection of State Highways 59 and 9A, with its western half of the town located in Pottawatomie County and its eastern half in Seminole County. The town was established along the dividing line between Oklahoma and Indian territories and in 1890 a barbed-wire fence was built from the North Canadian River to the Canadian River through the middle of town to keep Indians out of Oklahoma Territory. However, the fence did not deter the illegal distribution of alcohol to the Indians.

On April 16, 1896, a post office was established and the town named after Maud Sterns, a sister to the wives of the two owners of the first general store. Astronaut Leroy Gordon Cooper Jr. was the grandson of Philip Cooper and his wife Cora Sterns who were one of the owners of the store. A railroad depot built in 1903 serviced four passenger and eight freight trains daily on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway (in 1923 the Oklahoma City, Ada and Atoka Railway). In a short time one general store, three dry good stores, two drug stores, one blacksmith, three cotton gins, and one funeral parlor were built. The first newspaper, the “Maud Monitor”, was published in February 1904. Maud was incorporated on July 21, 1905. By 1910 the population had reached 503.

In the early 1920’s, due to the discovery of oil, Maud became a boomtown with an estimated population of 10,000, and its business district doubled. However, by 1930 Maud’s population dwindled to 4,326. At the turn of the twenty-first century the Maud Historical Museum was located on East Main in the old Irby Drugstore, and the town had a population of 1,136.

Historical Photos

Wanda Jean Jackson

In 1937 Wanda Jean Jackson was born in Maud. Her father Tom played piano in bar bands and worked whatever odd jobs he could find during the Depression. In 1941 he loaded up the family and headed for California and a better way of life. The family settled in Bakersfield.

Wanda first learned to sing in a church gospel choir. Her father bought her her first guitar, gave her lessons, and encouraged her to play piano as well. In addition, he took her to see such acts as Tex Williams, Spade Cooley, and Bob Wills, which left a lasting impression on her young mind. Tom moved the family back to Oklahoma City when Wanda was 12 years old.

 

While attending high school in 1952, Wanda won a talent show at a local radio station. Her prize was a daily fifteen-minute radio program on KLPR. The program, soon upped to 30 minutes, lasted throughout Jackson’s high school years. Jackson began her professional career while still attending Capitol Hill High School in Oklahoma City after being discovered by Hank Thompson in 1954, who heard her singing on local station KLPR-AM and invited her to perform with his band, the Brazos Valley Boys.

After graduating from high school, Jackson began to tour with her father as manager and chaperon. She often shared the bill with Elvis Presley, who encouraged Jackson to sing rockabilly. She was a cast member of ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee in Springfield, Missouri from 1955–1960, and in 1956 she signed with Capitol, recording a number of singles mixing country with rock and roll. “I Gotta Know” was released in 1956 & peaked at No. 15.

Special thanks goes to Sue Peters at the Maud Historical Museum for her assistance in research.

Museum hours are from 2:00 to 4:00 pm Saturday’s & Sunday’s or call (405)-374-2880 to make an appointment.

Museum Photos:

For more info on Wanda Jackson visit.
http://www.wandajackson.com

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Larry Wade Drennan
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Larry Wade Drennan

I lived in Maud from 1947 till 1955. Attended school from the 2nd grade until the end of the 8th grade when my father was transferred to West Texas. He worked for Mobil Oil Co. My mother was a beauty operator working for Mrs. Roberts at the beauty shop in the Roberts Hotel. I made many friends in Maud and am still friends with many of them today. Maud was a great place to live during that time. I will always have fond memories of living there.

Mark Crook
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Mark Crook

Wow, Maud is full of memories for me, some good, some, well….. I am glad to see that some people are trying to keep it going! My grandparents (Gilbert "Sr." and Dorothy Crook lived there (ever since I can remember) after moving from Ray City. They sold beef to O-Daniel's grocery from their farm south of town. My father Gilbert "GM" Crook as well as my aunt Marvella Crook (Martin), uncle E.O. "Corkey" Martin and my brother Bruce Floyd graduated from Maud high. I went to high school in Maud 72 to 76. I graduated and couldn't wait to leave… Read more »

James L. McMeekin
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James L. McMeekin

My father, Maynard Wilbur McMeekin, drilled oil wells near Maud beginning in early 1927. He met my mother, Dolly Hamilton, at a watermelon stand in Wewoka. They married in 1928. Apparently there was no housing available in Maud and the newly weds lived on the edge of town in a tent with a board floor and board walls about five feet high. I was told the area of tents was referred to as "Rag Town." I was born in the Maud Hospital on the 28th of August, 1929. As a baby, I spent the first 18 months of my life… Read more »

Jaclyn Malcom
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Jaclyn Malcom

I’m not sure why you are calling Maud a ghost town, while we have quite a few abandoned properties and the town has declined in many ways it is by no means a ghost town or abandoned. We have open schools, post office and businesses; we have community events and a decent population considering all the other oil boom days communities in the area.

Scott Tribbey
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Scott Tribbey

The drug store that was in Maud, was originally operated by a Arthur William Tribbey. This was my Great Grandfather. Has the drugstore been converted into a museum? Also my Great Great Grandfather Alpheus Milton lived there off of Broadway. I have been able to find the obits on their deaths.

ron hathcock
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ron hathcock

would like to find some who is doinggeneology on the hathcock linr .green loyd is my great great uncle whose father is loyd green hathcock, green is buried in one of the cemetaries around maude. My email is rjhath1950@gmail.com thanks ron hathcock

Terry
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Terry

Hello friends, thank you for your work on the history and comments of a town That holds heart felt memories. My family and I moved to Maud by accident in 1954. Grew up there from the 1st grade through the 6th. My fathers family all grew up in Maud, Oklahoma. My grandparents were Carl and Ida Skeen. They had the plumbing company and also took care of the Cummings Cemetary. I remember all the families that owned the stores in downtown Maud. Seeing the pictures and reading some of the comments posted brings back so many memories. For me…. It… Read more »

Shirley Bowder
Guest

Amen! Shirley Coward Bowder here. Was my home too. In fact my husband 's family the Crawfords are still there. We live in Ardmore. We come to see them. (overdue) But, Maud will always be our home.

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