Fallis, OK

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City/Town: Fallis
Location Class: SchoolDisappearing Town
Year Built: 1892
Year Abandoned: N/A
Status: AbandonedDisappearing Town
Photojournalist: Cody CooperJustin Tyler Moore

Fallis was an unusual little town. Located in a wooded area and “on a long red hill,” it became an agricultural center, a railroad town, and an oil community. More importantly, however, it was the home of five nationally recognized authors plus two well-known state poets. The original natural setting was beautiful, and, as one author noted, it was a source of inspiration. Founded in 1892 at the western edge of the Iowa Reservation, Fallis developed as an agricultural trade center. Cotton was the principal crop, and two cotton gins were in operation. In 1902 the Katy railroad built through Fallis when completing its line from Bartlesville to Oklahoma City. In 1903 the Katy built a line from Fallis to Guthrie. Also in 1903, the tracks of the Fort Smith and Western Railroad from Fort Smith to Guthrie crossed the Katy line at Fallis, making the community a trans-shipment center.

For a while it was believed a roundhouse and repair shops would be located in the town. The first oil well drilled in Lincoln County, in 1904, was near Fallis. Although it was of little importance, it did add income to the community. At the time of statehood Fallis had a population of about 350. Four general stores, a bakery, two lumberyards, two blacksmith shops, three hotels, a bank, two doctors, and four saloons, as well as other businesses, attested to the importance of Fallis as a trade center.

For so small a town to produce, or help to produce, so many well-known authors is remarkable. Blanche Seal Hunt wrote children’s stories, notably the “Little Brown Koko” series which appeared in Household Magazine for more than twenty years. She was a good friend of Beulah Rhodes Overman, a writer of popular and detective short stories. Jenny Harris Oliver was Poet Laureate of Oklahoma in 1940. Her works include several books of poems as well as such short stories as “It Is Morning” and “The Singing Hand of Joe Fitzpatrick? Vingie E. Roe, a close friend of Mrs. Oliver’s,was a writer of western novels, including such books as West of Abilene, Guns of Round Stone Valley, and Dust above the Sage. Her novel Divine Egotist used Fallis for its setting. Aletha Caldwell Conner edited the yearly Anthology of Poetry, written by various Oklahoma authors, during the 1930s. Her most noted novel was Pisces’s Child. Cecil Brown’s most important book of poems, Journey’s End, was published in 1948. Delbert Davis, Poet Laureate of Oklahoma in 1963, has written such poems as “Pipe Dreams,” “The Wild Cat,” and “Evening in the Hills.” Most of these authors knew each other and at times served as critics for one another. Fallis today is, for the most part, in shambles.

The Fort Smith and Western and a part of the Katy railroads have long been abandoned, and the remainder of the Katy tracks are unused. Two remaining brick buildings, which are falling apart, and the old bank vault still stand in the former business district along with the closed post office. The dozen homes remaining give evidence of the town’s demise. Streets are almost impassable, and yards are uncared for and full of weeds. The “wishing well” at the Oliver homestead remains. Koko Knoll, the Hunt homestead, occupies an excellent site, and the view to the east and south could be beautiful. It is the one remaining indicators of the former “golden period” of Fallis.

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tam
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tam

I would love to know how you obtained these pictures because this church is not abandoned and is private property! I know the owner and you broke into the church to take these pics! That is the same as breaking into someones home!!!!!

Henry Kissenger
Guest
Henry Kissenger

It's actually breaking into God's home!

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[…] attested to the importance of Fallis as a trade center." (Read/See more about Fallis: https://abandonedok.com/fallis/) Just before reaching the town of Fallis we came upon brand new black top. Now why would such a […]

Sherry
Guest
Sherry

My name is Sherry Fallis and my father was Leon Howard Fallis, born in Oklahoma, but not sure what town. Does anyone have any information about Alma Fallis (his mother)? His father (also Leonard Howard Fallis) died prior to my father being born. I was told that after his father died, Alma remarried someone who lived out in the woods and had quite a few children. I think 6 of them and 5 from Alma. Because of the depression, I think 8 of them were adopted out. I remember a James Fallis and Ruby Fallis, both half brother and sister… Read more »

shawna wold
Guest
shawna wold

My mother was a Fallis and this town was named after her family , dont know much more about it , can someone tell me. I knew years ago this town was named after my mothers side so anything would be helpful also is there a empty house that belonged to a Fallis??? Thanks Shawna

don
Guest
don

the cotton industry with its three railroads left town to start a massive exoduse ive always heard

Melissa Howard
Guest
Melissa Howard

Just happened upon this site when looking for info on the poet, Cecil Brown. My mother was born in Fallis in 1931. If my recollections are correct, my mother's family left Fallis for California around 1934 during the Dustbowl Era. I have been fortunate to inherit a signed copy of Brown's book of poems, Journey's End, prefaced with a personal inscription to my grandparents. According to research this book is somewhat rare and of historical significance. There are several references to Fallis and the surrounding area in his poetry.

Ghost Town Hunters
Guest
Ghost Town Hunters

According to the Ghost Towns of Oklahoma book, copyright 1978, states that the town was considered ended April 30, 1970 (just in case someone would like to know this information). All other info is exactly as this book puts it.

Lady Lelouch
Guest
Lady Lelouch

I did some research on this town and according to wikipedia, they had a population of 28 in 2000.

Don
Guest
Don

I found your website doing some family ancestry digging. I am the 6th generation from William Booker McCormack. According to his daughter's biography he lived on an Indian reservation called Iowa Indian Village. Researching the reservation uncovers that he may have been a missionary. Further digging says this reservation was near Fallis. I may try and visit tomorrow. Thank you for your website.

micheal
Guest
micheal

idk about you but i live in a small town near fallis and we would go out thare atnight and it was scary and when the old hotel was up i was honted if you have eany questions emal me at mccorkle_micheal@yahoo.com

Paula
Guest
Paula

I have sent you an email.
During the 50's parents were friends of Elvin and Flo McCorkle in Fallis.
Please contact me if you are related to them.
Thank you,
Paula

Denisha
Guest
Denisha

This looks like a neat place with alot of stories. I would love to come up and look around sometime. Why is it listed as a ghost town if it isnt as abandoned as it is made out to be? I saw that a paranormal team toured fallis! Was anything paranormal going on in the town or does anyone know of any hauntings in the town. Well it looks like a really great historical place.If anyone has any interesting stories to tell about fallis please e-mail me at denisha_n_cory@yahoo.com thanks.

Carl Bell
Guest
Carl Bell

I have to echo Patrick's words of caution that Fallis is less abandoned than one might think. Announce your presence. Be respectful. Most people in the area are friendly, but don't get caught on the wrong side of a potential home invasion when someone else has legal title and a loaded shotgun. Makes for a really bad visit. Just the same, come see the place!

Bev A. Moore
Guest
Bev A. Moore

My mother Marcella Bellah Kennemer grew up near Fallis in an old log home called the Balyeat place. Her grandmother was Anne Goggin, so we are probably related to the current fire chief. She was amazed recently to see the pictures posted of a rock formation that is somewhere near Fallis. Three generatiosn of her family lived within a few miles of Fallis and never knew about the rocks and would like to know exactly where they are and more about them. Do they have a name? Where they on the old Huff property or before than the Couts?

Patrick Goggin
Guest
Patrick Goggin

I beleive the rock formations are on the evans place just south of downtown Fallis.And yes we are related.Email me @ buckshot2@pcsok.com

Patrick Goggin
Guest
Patrick Goggin

I am the fire chief of Fallis and want to assure you the town is not as abanded as you think the old church is used for pool games on weekends and I spend lots of time there the owner of most of the town is Alva Hull and I would not want to be caught looking around on his property

Josh
Guest
Josh

I was wondering if you are still in fallis or still know mr hull. I stopped by his house but no one was home.

Andy
Guest
Andy

That means stay out

meg
Guest
meg

saw fallis today for the first time. pretty damn cool. probable one of my faves bc of the dirt roads and absolute nothingness

Brian A. Hopkins
Guest

Visited Fallis yesterday. Photos and musings are here: http://www.sff.net/people/brian_a_hopkins/fallis….

Thanks for the great website!

Kyle Webster
Guest
Kyle Webster

I went with some people at night and after the Fallis sign at the entrance we couldn’t find anything but the first house and the school bus we drove around forever. Someone tell me how to get to the town with all the abandoned stuff. But we did explore the Fallis cemetery that dated 1893

AbandonedOK Team
Guest

You pretty much saw it all. The community center with the stuff in it, is still in use occasionally which is why it has a pool table and electricity. So I wouldn't go in there.

Alex Martin
Guest
Alex Martin

I agree with Shawn Harlan. It’s odd that so much stuff, especially a pool table and sticks and so much clothes. Something must have happened there I think.

shawn harlan
Guest
shawn harlan

our paranormal team went and toured around fallis one day took some pictures and video, it seems that everyone left in a big hurry leaving alot of stuff behind. I was wondering does anyone hasve any idea about what happened to the town to make everyone up and disappear in such a hurry? Please email me and let me know what the history is behind it or at least what you may know or have heard about it, my email address is , shawnharlan72@yahoo.com

Charrity
Guest
Charrity

It really didn't happen in a hurry. A few people were able to get nicer houses in the town of Wellston and other places. (Most all were running down because of age) One man lived in a small 3 room house for years until it burned because of electrical problems and then he moved into Wellston. Due to road upkeep and Wellston being so close and having most of what Fallis did not by the millenium not many people had a reason to live or frequent Fallis unless they just like the seculsiveness. The church closed down when the preacher… Read more »

psychosaw13
Guest
psychosaw13

Well that was just pretty much bad ass! The school bus was my fave!

AbandonedOK Team
Guest

I know right? The school bus is amazing. You couldn’t see it from the road, and I never would have found it had I not parked and walked around through the woods.

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