Maud, OK

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City/Town: Maud
Location Class: Disappearing Town
Year Built: April 16, 1896
Year Abandoned: N/A
Status: AbandonedDisappearing Town
Photojournalist: Jennifer BurtonLeslie Flaming

History:

Maud, OK is best known as the birthplace of Wanda Jackson, the queen of rockabilly. The town is located at the intersection of State Highways 59 and 9A, with its western half of the town located in Pottawatomie County and its eastern half in Seminole County. The town was established along the dividing line between Oklahoma and Indian territories and in 1890 a barbed-wire fence was built from the North Canadian River to the Canadian River through the middle of town to keep Indians out of Oklahoma Territory. However, the fence did not deter the illegal distribution of alcohol to the Indians.

On April 16, 1896, a post office was established and the town named after Maud Sterns, a sister to the wives of the two owners of the first general store. Astronaut Leroy Gordon Cooper Jr. was the grandson of Philip Cooper and his wife Cora Sterns who were one of the owners of the store. A railroad depot built in 1903 serviced four passenger and eight freight trains daily on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway (in 1923 the Oklahoma City, Ada and Atoka Railway). In a short time one general store, three dry good stores, two drug stores, one blacksmith, three cotton gins, and one funeral parlor were built. The first newspaper, the “Maud Monitor”, was published in February 1904. Maud was incorporated on July 21, 1905. By 1910 the population had reached 503.

In the early 1920’s, due to the discovery of oil, Maud became a boomtown with an estimated population of 10,000, and its business district doubled. However, by 1930 Maud’s population dwindled to 4,326. At the turn of the twenty-first century the Maud Historical Museum was located on East Main in the old Irby Drugstore, and the town had a population of 1,136.

Historical Photos

Wanda Jean Jackson

In 1937 Wanda Jean Jackson was born in Maud. Her father Tom played piano in bar bands and worked whatever odd jobs he could find during the Depression. In 1941 he loaded up the family and headed for California and a better way of life. The family settled in Bakersfield.

Wanda first learned to sing in a church gospel choir. Her father bought her her first guitar, gave her lessons, and encouraged her to play piano as well. In addition, he took her to see such acts as Tex Williams, Spade Cooley, and Bob Wills, which left a lasting impression on her young mind. Tom moved the family back to Oklahoma City when Wanda was 12 years old.

 

While attending high school in 1952, Wanda won a talent show at a local radio station. Her prize was a daily fifteen-minute radio program on KLPR. The program, soon upped to 30 minutes, lasted throughout Jackson’s high school years. Jackson began her professional career while still attending Capitol Hill High School in Oklahoma City after being discovered by Hank Thompson in 1954, who heard her singing on local station KLPR-AM and invited her to perform with his band, the Brazos Valley Boys.

After graduating from high school, Jackson began to tour with her father as manager and chaperon. She often shared the bill with Elvis Presley, who encouraged Jackson to sing rockabilly. She was a cast member of ABC-TV’s Ozark Jubilee in Springfield, Missouri from 1955–1960, and in 1956 she signed with Capitol, recording a number of singles mixing country with rock and roll. “I Gotta Know” was released in 1956 & peaked at No. 15.

Special thanks goes to Sue Peters at the Maud Historical Museum for her assistance in research.

Museum hours are from 2:00 to 4:00 pm Saturday’s & Sunday’s or call (405)-374-2880 to make an appointment.

Museum Photos:

For more info on Wanda Jackson visit.
http://www.wandajackson.com

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judy korten
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judy korten

This is the 1st I have heard of my great grandparents,does anyone know whow they were?

judy korten
Guest
judy korten

This is from ancestery.com…. When the Marx family moved to Pottowatomie County, Oklahoma they lived most of the remainder of their life in Maude, OK. In Maude they Opened a small grocery/gas station on the old highway when it was still gravel. — with Angie Norbury and Judy Korten.

Cynthia Rutledge
Guest
Cynthia Rutledge

I went to school with a girl named Doreena Marx…maybe if you can find her she may know of your grandparents. She was about the same age as Penny O'Daniel the daughter of Ray and Betty O'Daniel. Good luck on your search.

Cynthia Rutledge
Guest
Cynthia Rutledge

I went to school with a girl named Doreena Marx…maybe if you can find her she may know of your grandparents. She was about the same age as Penny O'Daniel the daughter of Ray and Betty O'Daniel. Good luck on your search.

Just saw a post from Suzy Marx Garner from Maud…posted on the page "You know your from Maud if"…maybe this is a long lost relative of yours…

judy korten
Guest
judy korten

My Dad loved this picture..It is his grandmother, Emma and her siblings. He remember quite well visiting Oscar and Ben. Ben lived in Maude until his passing. This is awesome.

Carrie
Guest
Carrie

I was so glad to find this blog!! My husband and I travel to Maud twice a month and we always wonder what happened there. It looks like it was at one time such a wonderful town!! Hope they will be able to see new growth! Thanks again!

Bruce Patton
Guest
Bruce Patton

I love the photos all of them, they have taken me down memories lane, I moved to Maud 1955 iI was in Mrs. Burton's 5th grade class and in my opinion she was the best teacher I had or can remember having. I mowed lawn all over Maud, attended Firs Church of God, Worked in O'Danial's Grocery enjoyed many days in the Irby Drug Store Cherry Cokes and Cherry Phosphates and read all their comic books, I also worked for Al in the Texaco Station, Maud was my town and when I had to move away January 1962 my junior… Read more »

Linda flesher
Guest
Linda flesher

Do you remember my husband Cecil flesher

Chad
Guest
Chad

Don't want to step on any toes, but who cares about the new bank? The old bank looks interesting, historic and very rare. New banks all look the same. There aren't very many left that look like Maud's original bank. Citizens of Maud, whatever you do, don't let the old bank disappear. If the structure fails, at least save the interior fixtures and furnishings and put it in a museum somewhere. Woodwork like that is almost priceless!

Sherri
Guest
Sherri

My grandparents and father were born in Maud. My grandmother told me that a tornado destroyed some of the buildings and a fire too. I don't remember which came first. At that time the buildings extended past the old car wash on Main Street. I used to walk along there and you could still see some of the names of the former stores on the pavement. My grandpa's family started and owned Hilton's Grocery in St. Louis. I lived in Maud from 1977 to 1986 as my former husband was from Maud.

Chris McKinney
Guest
Chris McKinney

I lived in Maud all my life until the last half of my senior year in high school. ( 1973-1974 ). I wouldn't trade the memories for anything. I know very little of whats become my classmates. I was in the high school looking at the senior pictures displayed in the hallway. It's amazing how the average class size of 32 to 35 dropped to about 16 in just 1 year or so never to be regained. Was there a mass exodus?

Billy Bennett
Guest
Billy Bennett

I agree with you Chris,I wouldn't trade my memories of Maud for anything. I was wondering if you are related to Mike McKinney? I ran around with him & got in trouble with him all the time……LOL

Robert Renfro
Guest

I know a Chris and Mike Mckinney as well, they are my uncles. I haven't been to Maud in ages, really need to make a trip soon.

Sue Peters
Guest
Sue Peters

Thanks Francis and So sorry I forgot the Fire Department. You are right about the Building and Equiptment but lets not forget to mention the Men who do their jobs when called upon. Our hats are off to them!!!!!

Frances Dees
Guest
Frances Dees

I am so proud of Sue Peters for the information about Maud. We lived in Maud from 1966-1978 and still have really good friends there. George opened the Automotive Dept.for Maud HighSchool and taught there until moving to Shawnee to contunue teaching at Gordon Cooper Vo-Tech. There are a lot of old building that need attention, but there are new buildings also and good people who are trying to build their life there. We have two great grandchildren who live there and their mother teaches at Maud Grade School. We hope and pray that the school does not close for… Read more »

Jan (Dees) Bush
Guest
Jan (Dees) Bush

Hello, Your last name caught my attention as my maidan name was Dees, my dad's name was George Wayne, he had 2 brothers that had children they were Carl & Jesse. We lived in Tulsa,Ok but all of the older relatives lived in Durant, Tishamingo, Madill. If you are related in any way it would be nice to correspond with you. As our family was never close as far as visiting with one another. We are Choctaw/Miss Choctaw if this helps. Since Dees is rather an unusal name I just thought it would be interesting if we were related. Hope… Read more »

Sue Peters
Guest
Sue Peters

Maud will soon have another new building. First Baptist is in the process of building a beautiful new church. There old building is one of the most beautiful buildings, with lovely stain glass windows. We also have several other nice Churchs. In closing, I would like to invite everyone to come see our Museum. We are not your usual museum, but we tell the story of Maud and its people. One can travel to almost anywhere in the USA and start a conversation with people and before you know it, they know someone from Maud, or have lived in Maud,… Read more »

N Jean Bibb Robinson
Guest
N Jean Bibb Robinson

We visited Maud Tuesday and walked the cemetery then returned Wednesday to see the Museum and check records at City Hall. Although the Museum was closed it is obvious the city has a rich history and we hope to learn more about the area if we get the opportunity to come again when it is open as several local residents mentioned the historical work being done. We are looking for more information about my father, Richard Bibb, who lived in Maud in the late 1920's and early 1930's. We believe his stillborn son born in 1929 and stillborn daughter born… Read more »

Gary Bland
Guest
Gary Bland

My dad, C. O. Bland was pastor of First Baptist from 1942 until 1946. We lived in the old building on the top floor. It was like a big apartment with a large kitchen, living room, and bedrooms. The church actually had two kitchens. The one on the top floor and one on the bottom floor, which could be called the basement. I was 5 years old when we moved there and spent the best 4 years of my life in the old church. Most people would not know there were two choir sections in the sanctuary. One was over… Read more »

Sue Peters
Guest
Sue Peters

I know your article had to do with the decline of many Oklahoma towns. I only wish you would have mentioned our new buildings like Buddy's Hardware, Maud Food Center , City Hall and our newest, the Dollar General. Wanda Jackson is one of our best know citizens, but there are others. For instance, David Boren grew up visiting his grandparents who lived in Maud. Gov. Brad Henry's father, Charles graduated for Maud, he played basketball on the team my husband , Don played on. Gov. Henry's Grandparents taught at Maud and several other schools in the area.

Sue Peters
Guest
Sue Peters

Our little town, like many others, has fallen on hard times. When the oil businesses left our area in the early l980s, we begin our decline. Our nursing home, which was one of the finest in the state, also closed several years ago and along with that went the jobs of many of our citizens. There are people here who still see what Maud could become if the right people would take an interest in the town. It would be wonderful to see people come in, purchuse, repair and occupy some of the abandoned buildings. The bank is still used… Read more »

amanda
Guest
amanda

these pictures were in no way taken to out of disrespect for the town of maud or its people. this was more a piece on what the town has become and its history. the pictures were centered around the downtown area which has little to nothing going on. the buildings are in complete disrepair and have just been left to rot….just like in so many other small towns in oklahoma.

Matt
Guest
Matt

I think the argument being made is that what you didn't post pictures of tells as much about the current state of the community as the ones that were posted. Any way you want to look at it, Maud is a great home for those who want to be there, and it is viewed negatively by those who want to be somewhere else.

K. Peters
Guest
K. Peters

Exactly. And, I do believe, the old bank is owned by people who work very hard to preserve what history they can of the town. It hasn't been left to rot, nor has the museum.

K. Peters
Guest
K. Peters

I'm glad to see you thanked Sue Peters for sharing her time with you. From her, you should have realized there is still hope in this town. I understand you wouldn't be interested in pictures of the new bank; however, by showing pictures of the old bank, you've made it seem as if it were closed–or abandoned. There are many people, as Sue Peters, who still love this community and will never leave. There have been numerous additions to Maud recently. I can agree the town isn't as strong as it was during the oil-days, but I wouldn't consider it… Read more »

Matt
Guest
Matt

It's hard to say that we are on the verge of becoming a "ghost town" when we have a brand new Dollar General!!!!! That's right! In all seriousness, the town still has many citizens who care very much about the town. Unfortunately, all you see on the news and in the newspapers about the town are negative things. In my short lifetime, I have seen the town go down hill a bit, but I don't think we (our town and community) are on the verge of becoming extinct.

amanda
Guest
amanda

sorry you feel that way corey….however, not really interested in pictures of the new bank…..glad to see you completely missed the point of this.

J. Lang
Guest
J. Lang

The museum is in what was the drugstore. That fountain sure brings back memories!! My sisters and brother worked there, and the pharmacist (name???) is probably responsible for my two brothers becoming pharmacists.
A LOT of folks went on to important positions in life. Amazing.

Dan
Guest
Dan

The Pharmacist was Robert Monroe "Bob" Snelson. He practiced until he was 80 years old. Mr. Snelson was a Mason & was very active in the Rotary club & other civic activities. He served at least two terms as mayor of Maud. His wife was Verna Inona (Woodworth) Snelson. They had three children: Amy Claire Snelson, Robert Woodworth Snelson & Frankie Ruth Snelson. As of this writing, Amy & Frankie are deceased.

J. Lang
Guest
J. Lang

I lived in Maud from 1957 – 1964 when I was a child. I remember walking to O'Daniels and to the corner drugstore. There was a soda fountain there…
My dad was superintendent of schools, and his office was in the high school building. I spent many hours during the summers, wandering the halls of that school. It was really creepy–especially in the biology room! I don't know if the school is still in use, but if it's not, it's probably haunted!! lol

maud resident
Guest
maud resident

Yes, it is still in use, and it probably is haunted! The district wants to close it down because the bills are so high and there are not enough students in it to keep such a big building, but for now its still going. I hope they don't close it down then it will just be another beautiful building left to rot around here.

Guest
Guest
Guest

That is a beautiful building–I was just in it yesterday, interviewing for an opening.

corey jennings
Guest
corey jennings

well atleast you took pic of the worst possible shit in maud and the pics are terrible thats the old bank they built a new bank just down the street and both the bodkin furiture and the old texaco gas station was owned by junk dealer and thats is all his left over bull shit

Paula
Guest
Paula

Absolutely beautiful photography. Can you take pics from the street without trespassing? Thanx!

psychosaw13
Guest
psychosaw13

Yes Paula, I would imagine you could take lots of pics without tresspassing. Maud is still an active town. It is on the verge of becoming a ghost town though. I would visit the Historical Mueseum for more info a bout taking pics near the buildings

wendi
Guest
wendi

The people there are very welcoming to visitors, especially if you have questions about the town's history! The buildings themselves are unsafe and crumbling, so taking pictures outside, from a safe distance would be fine.

Lane
Guest
Lane

What a trip. Thanks so much for this post! I lived in Maud in the mid-late 70's as a youngster. Believe it or not the town was fairly bustling at the time. Many of those stores, and especially the bank, bring back so many memories. It's really hard to believe in just a few short years the town declined so much.

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